Archive for July, 2012

22 Trends in Education

Posted: July 31, 2012 in Uncategorized

Twenty two trends in education technology, e-learn and distance learning,

social-media-agency-consultant

Here are some of the “key emerging technologies” that ed tech group thought were very possible education technology trends in the not so distant future (here is the formal Horizons 2009 report)

1) Audio seminars/podcasting
2) wikis
3) blogs
4) collaboration tools/sites
5) mobiles applications/cell phones as personal learning devices
6) microblogging + twitter
7) flip cameras + youtube
8} facebook
9) student oriented portfolio
10) digital storytelling
11) citizen journalism
12) geotagging
13) social bookmarking
14) blended learning (hybrid courses)
15) blackboard
16) virtual world
17) jinga webcasting (???)
18) iphone mobile outreach
19) small screen learning objects
20) screen casting
21) camtasia
22) hi def video conferencing [not buying it]

Technologies with Education Application in the Report:

Voice Thread
Adobe Buzzword
Google Docs
Facebook
MySpace
Ning
Moodle
Pageflakes
Mind meister
iCue (created by NBC for social studies)
Classroom 2.0
RezEd
Flat Classroom Project
Project New Media Literacies
Swift Classroom
Youth Media Exchange
Global Kids in Second Life

Education Technology Trends in the Report:

• Dealing with Ambiguity
• Collective intelligence (wikipedia, Amazon suggestions, Netflix suggestions). “How we answer questions. Not all questions have factual answers. More qualitative than quantitative. Students need to be able to answer these questions too.”
• Visualization tools makes info more meaningful for both text and data sets. (Wordle + Wasabi for finance + Mint.com)
• Mobile phones changing incredibly fast (change after a year…whole generation of devices) Iphone (shake, touch) “More like little computers, and less like telephones.” Applications

3 Year Time Frame for Educational Technology Trends

• Cloud computing like Twitter (3 year timeframe)
• Geo-everything + geo-tagging. For instance trip to a botanical garden or Urban Spoon (3 year timeframe)
• The personal web. Flips the nature of the web. We can personalize to whats interesting + most important to us. Easy publishing like blogging. Also media aggregation services. Also collaboration tools + collaborative authoring tool. Collaborative textbooks via Flatworld Knowledge. Also page flakes and netvibes for project resources. Like a portal. Also personal learning environments and personal learning networks.

Far time horizon for education technology trends

Semantically aware applications. Applications can understand the meaning of text. (Turkey bird vs. Turkey the country) Trip It: the online travel iternaray uses this to some extent
• Smart Objects (2 dimensional barcode, can take a picture which leads to a URL. Like tagging the world) For instance a tire that knows it needs. Or in a science lab that says “don’t mix.” Libraries could use this by embedding smart technology (for instance location based–its been mishelved). Blocks on TED talks. Also smart clothing.

Challenges in Education Technology and New Media

• Changes in scholarship (recognize + reward)
• Meaningful assessment. Better data mining (current systems, can’t keep up)
• Need to keep up with mobile.

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Advances in virtual communication and changes in consumption patterns increasingly affect adoption of new business schemes. 

 The future can’t reveal itself, but some of its major trends can be noted. Weeks earlier when speaking about Internet Day, we highlighted the enormous changes that web brought into the current scope of business. Today we would like to share our perspective on its future.In the short and medium term, the horizon of corporate innovations includes a number of trends, which, driven by technological development, are changing the present way of thinking and running business. Their consequences are just beginning to show, however it is important to note that many of these trends challenge our classical notion of production and consumption. That’s why business leaders should carefully observe and study them to anticipate future economic scenario.Here are some of the most important trends,> Virtual communication. More and better. Remote communication will continue to experience improvement. According to Forbes analyst Rita McGrath, improvement of 3D technologies and other systems of software commands recognition (gesturing, voice, etc) will further facilitate creation of virtual teams. In line with this, the increasing quality of all forms of telepresence will provide even greater tendency for outsourcing.> Complementarities and competence: while technological advances increasingly foster subcontracting and outsourcing, experts anticipate that large companies will not only continue to exist alongside entrepreneurs, but will use them to reinvent themselves. This is due to the structures of small, digital work communities, which are – and will be – more flexible and permeable to changes.  Simultaneously, boundaries between certain sectors of the economy diffuse. The most significant example of this is online payment system, a niche equally tempting to banks, credit cards and telecommunication companies.> Biometric data and systems. Greater integration. Not only information on customers is more accurate, but also its integration with more sophisticated treatment systems enables the creation of more specific products. A good example of this is nearly 9,000 apps on health, which Apple currently offers. According to the consultant Tim Sweeney, this trend will increase; therefore, applications based on personal biometrics are included as one of the trends that will significantly affect businesses of the future. For this reason, it is likely that certain products that today seem revolutionary (such as items that include sensors to measure vital signs and communicate those wirelessly) will extend to all sectors of economy.> From “have” to “access”. The fourth big “trend” of the new digital economy implies a new way of consuming and, as such, will have effects on all stages of production and circulation of goods. “On demand” technologies, initially confined to the entertainment audiovisual industry, will extend into a wide range of products and services. In general, access to goods and services will be more important than their direct ‘possession’. In our virtual age, there are some who consider the verb ‘to have’ obsolete.Assumptions and realitiesFaced with a scenario determined by accelerated transformations, it is likely that many business leaders feel overwhelmed with the amount of technology-related information, whose data is constantly changing. However, it is much more interesting to analyze trends in the light of a single fundamental question: how can they be incorporated to restate a business plan and make it more profitable?In search of this answer, experts advise to be well informed (that means to have access to a variety of sources on technology and business) and, above all, be prepared to contrast ingrained assumptions with undeniable course of economy.

Makeup & Cosmetic Business

Posted: July 5, 2012 in Uncategorized
Home Business Center: How to start a home business

Start a Makeup / Cosmetics Business 1-2-3


Makeup artists are in high demand in a variety of different fields: from television to salons to weddings to modeling agencies to advertisements and more.

Each state has its own licensing requirements, but generally makeup artists will need to complete training, pass an exam and work a certain number of field hours in order to receive a cosmetology license.

Start by contacting the Board of Cosmetology in your state for requirements and procedures.

Use a cosmetics business plan to outline the steps needed to become a makeup artist. Or maybe you are interested in opening a cosmetics store or starting a makeup line?…

Steps to Starting a Makeup Artist Business

1. Acquire the education and training you need to become a makeup artist. Once you complete your training and hours, you can take the cosmetology licensing exam and obtain your license. You will also need a business license, which you would apply for after you register your business with the county clerk’s office.

2. Next, establish a business bank account. This way, you can take payments from clients while keeping business and personal finances separate. Consider accepting credit cards from customers, as this can greatly increase your income.

3. Manage business finances with easy-to-use accounting software. You’ll be able to track income and outgo, but also invoice clients, manage customers and print tax reports. You may also want invoice software.

4. Purchase the makeup artist supplies that you need. There are also some great online resources for airbrush makeup and private label mineral makeup that you can sell under your own name.

Basic supplies include brushes, makeup kits, containers, disposable applicators, brush cleaners, alcohol, sponges, eyelash curlers, etc.. but also general business supplies like business cards, business forms and a business phone line.

5. Set up a company website using a professional free website builder. A website is an inexpensive marketing tool and is ideal for displaying images of your location, staff, your background, a list of services you provide, a map to your office, coupons, client testimonials, etc..

6. Having contacts in the field can greatly help your career, so volunteer and internet when you’re getting started. The connections you make can pay off later in more clients and less ad costs. If you need help writing a business plan, use the cosmetics business plan template.

Getting Started:

Become a Makeup ArtistGet insider tips from Emmy Award-Winning Makeup Pros and save yourself a lot of time and money. Avoid common mistakes and get the answers you need to get your business profitable – quickly. Find out:

  • What types of makeup and application tools you should have in your professional makeup kit, what other supplies you need to get started – and how to launch with little or no money.
  • Information on getting permits, a license, other legal requirements, where to find suppliers, how to set up a storefront or work from home.
  • As Seen in Oprah's NewsletterHow to identify potential clients, get creative marketing ideas and prepare promotional materials that land you jobs. Plus how to create a professional portfolioand do a client presentation that will impress people so you don’t have to do a hard sales pitch.
  • Makeup artist invoice template, press releases and cover letters included.

Go!Makeup Artist Start-Up Guide

Cosmetics Marketing and Advertising Techniques

1. Your Portfolio:

Start by building your portfolio. New clients will want to see your “work”, and pictures are a great tool for demonstrating this. Also get testimonials from past customers if you can. If you are just starting out without any customers, you can volunteer at local fashion shows to build up your portfolio.

2. Business Name Ideas for Makeup Artists:

Your company name is also important in marketing. A good business name tells people who you are, shows how you differentiate yourself from the marketplace and determines how the public perceives you. Use the free business name generator to help you come up with a name for your cosmetics business. An impressive logo is also important – a picture is worth 1,000 words. Design your own logo for cheap.

3. Makeup Artist Business Cards:

Have business cards and brochures printed to introduce your business (See cosmetics brochure designs). Partner with local businesses offering similar beauty services to yours – but not directly competing with you (i.e. tanning salons, hair or nail salons, spas, etc..). Ask if you can leave a few business cards or brochures with them in exchange for handing out their brochures/business cards to your clients. You may want to offer a first-time buyer discount in your brochure to attract new customers to contact you.

4. Write a short press release to your local newspaper (here’s how: press release writing tips) announcing your new business and the services you offer. Include a limited offer or details on a special event you are hosting that will make your story interesting. The more interesting the story, the more likely the newspaper (or magazine) is to print it. Remember – this is FREE advertising, so use it to your benefit. You can submit more than one press release, and you can contact your local radio and TV stations as well.

Other public relations strategies you can use to get free advertising for your cosmetics business:

5. Write articles. You don’t have to be a professional writer, but you can get free press and draw in customers by sharing helpful or interesting information in your area of expertise. Articles can be short, and you can submit them to multiple article directories online for free. See how to write articles to get customers.
6. Use social media. Twitter and Facebook can get you a lot of free publicity when used correctly. The key is to combine useful content for your readers in addition to promotional efforts.
7. Start speaking. Many women’s organizations or community groups like to have speakers at their meetings or events. Look for groups oriented toward fashion, beauty and women’s interests, and you get free publicity for your business by giving a brief and informative presentation or workshop. This also helps establish you as an expert in your field. Get free advertising with public speaking.
8. Want people to find your website in the search engines? Get listed in 20 search engines for free or in 300 search engines for $4.

Finding Cosmetics Jobs & Customers

Job Search  
job title, keywords, company, location jobs by job search

Whether you want to find customers or do freelance work as an independent contractor, online job sites can be a good way to find work and clients.

Why? Some companies looking to hire may be open to outsource to an independent contractor because they don’t have to incur hiring fees. You can also set up a partnership where you pay them a referral fee for any customers they send you. See also: Find Freelance Work Online

Cosmetics Business Associations

  • Personal Care Products CouncilThe Personal Care Products Council is the leading national trade association for the cosmetic and personal care products industry and represents the most innovative names in beauty today.
  • Independent Cosmetics Manufacturers and DistributorsICMAD is a non-profit group that offers services to innovative cosmetic companies to help them succeed in the highly cometitive cosmetic market.
  • Organic Consumers Association Consumers Association (OCA) is an online and grassroots non-profit 501(c)3 public interest organization campaigning for health, justice, and sustainability. The OCA deals with crucial issues of food safety, industrial agriculture, genetic engineering, children’s health, corporate accountability, Fair Trade, environmental sustainability and other key topics.
     
  Home Business CenterRead Next: How to Start a Mobile Spa  
     
Like us? Share us! Can’t Find Something? Let Us Know!
Free eBook!Learn new ways to increase your income each month. Plus get the Home Business Insider that shows how you can make money this week by freelancing. All Free!
Email address First name Topics you want to learn about We don’t spam & won’t sell your email

 

Helping Entrepreneurs Succeed Since 1997. Faster, Easier, Cheaper.

© 1997-
2012 By Home Business Center, Inc. | California USA

Start-Up Business Checklist Business Start-Up Guides Small Business Financing Marketing Ideas Advertising   Contact Us Privacy About Us Better Business Bureau Small Business Administration
 

Makeup & Cosmetic Business

Posted: July 5, 2012 in Uncategorized
Home Business Center: How to start a home business

Start a Makeup / Cosmetics Business 1-2-3


Makeup artists are in high demand in a variety of different fields: from television to salons to weddings to modeling agencies to advertisements and more.

Each state has its own licensing requirements, but generally makeup artists will need to complete training, pass an exam and work a certain number of field hours in order to receive a cosmetology license.

Start by contacting the Board of Cosmetology in your state for requirements and procedures.

Use a cosmetics business plan to outline the steps needed to become a makeup artist. Or maybe you are interested in opening a cosmetics store or starting a makeup line?…

Steps to Starting a Makeup Artist Business

1. Acquire the education and training you need to become a makeup artist. Once you complete your training and hours, you can take the cosmetology licensing exam and obtain your license. You will also need a business license, which you would apply for after you register your business with the county clerk’s office.

2. Next, establish a business bank account. This way, you can take payments from clients while keeping business and personal finances separate. Consider accepting credit cards from customers, as this can greatly increase your income.

3. Manage business finances with easy-to-use accounting software. You’ll be able to track income and outgo, but also invoice clients, manage customers and print tax reports. You may also want invoice software.

4. Purchase the makeup artist supplies that you need. There are also some great online resources for airbrush makeup and private label mineral makeup that you can sell under your own name.

Basic supplies include brushes, makeup kits, containers, disposable applicators, brush cleaners, alcohol, sponges, eyelash curlers, etc.. but also general business supplies like business cards, business forms and a business phone line.

5. Set up a company website using a professional free website builder. A website is an inexpensive marketing tool and is ideal for displaying images of your location, staff, your background, a list of services you provide, a map to your office, coupons, client testimonials, etc..

6. Having contacts in the field can greatly help your career, so volunteer and internet when you’re getting started. The connections you make can pay off later in more clients and less ad costs. If you need help writing a business plan, use the cosmetics business plan template.

Getting Started:

Become a Makeup ArtistGet insider tips from Emmy Award-Winning Makeup Pros and save yourself a lot of time and money. Avoid common mistakes and get the answers you need to get your business profitable – quickly. Find out:

  • What types of makeup and application tools you should have in your professional makeup kit, what other supplies you need to get started – and how to launch with little or no money.
  • Information on getting permits, a license, other legal requirements, where to find suppliers, how to set up a storefront or work from home.
  • As Seen in Oprah's NewsletterHow to identify potential clients, get creative marketing ideas and prepare promotional materials that land you jobs. Plus how to create a professional portfolioand do a client presentation that will impress people so you don’t have to do a hard sales pitch.
  • Makeup artist invoice template, press releases and cover letters included.

Go!Makeup Artist Start-Up Guide

Cosmetics Marketing and Advertising Techniques

1. Your Portfolio:

Start by building your portfolio. New clients will want to see your “work”, and pictures are a great tool for demonstrating this. Also get testimonials from past customers if you can. If you are just starting out without any customers, you can volunteer at local fashion shows to build up your portfolio.

2. Business Name Ideas for Makeup Artists:

Your company name is also important in marketing. A good business name tells people who you are, shows how you differentiate yourself from the marketplace and determines how the public perceives you. Use the free business name generator to help you come up with a name for your cosmetics business. An impressive logo is also important – a picture is worth 1,000 words. Design your own logo for cheap.

3. Makeup Artist Business Cards:

Have business cards and brochures printed to introduce your business (See cosmetics brochure designs). Partner with local businesses offering similar beauty services to yours – but not directly competing with you (i.e. tanning salons, hair or nail salons, spas, etc..). Ask if you can leave a few business cards or brochures with them in exchange for handing out their brochures/business cards to your clients. You may want to offer a first-time buyer discount in your brochure to attract new customers to contact you.

4. Write a short press release to your local newspaper (here’s how: press release writing tips) announcing your new business and the services you offer. Include a limited offer or details on a special event you are hosting that will make your story interesting. The more interesting the story, the more likely the newspaper (or magazine) is to print it. Remember – this is FREE advertising, so use it to your benefit. You can submit more than one press release, and you can contact your local radio and TV stations as well.

Other public relations strategies you can use to get free advertising for your cosmetics business:

5. Write articles. You don’t have to be a professional writer, but you can get free press and draw in customers by sharing helpful or interesting information in your area of expertise. Articles can be short, and you can submit them to multiple article directories online for free. See how to write articles to get customers.
6. Use social media. Twitter and Facebook can get you a lot of free publicity when used correctly. The key is to combine useful content for your readers in addition to promotional efforts.
7. Start speaking. Many women’s organizations or community groups like to have speakers at their meetings or events. Look for groups oriented toward fashion, beauty and women’s interests, and you get free publicity for your business by giving a brief and informative presentation or workshop. This also helps establish you as an expert in your field. Get free advertising with public speaking.
8. Want people to find your website in the search engines? Get listed in 20 search engines for free or in 300 search engines for $4.

Finding Cosmetics Jobs & Customers

Job Search  
job title, keywords, company, location jobs by job search

Whether you want to find customers or do freelance work as an independent contractor, online job sites can be a good way to find work and clients.

Why? Some companies looking to hire may be open to outsource to an independent contractor because they don’t have to incur hiring fees. You can also set up a partnership where you pay them a referral fee for any customers they send you. See also: Find Freelance Work Online

Cosmetics Business Associations

  • Personal Care Products CouncilThe Personal Care Products Council is the leading national trade association for the cosmetic and personal care products industry and represents the most innovative names in beauty today.
  • Independent Cosmetics Manufacturers and DistributorsICMAD is a non-profit group that offers services to innovative cosmetic companies to help them succeed in the highly cometitive cosmetic market.
  • Organic Consumers Association Consumers Association (OCA) is an online and grassroots non-profit 501(c)3 public interest organization campaigning for health, justice, and sustainability. The OCA deals with crucial issues of food safety, industrial agriculture, genetic engineering, children’s health, corporate accountability, Fair Trade, environmental sustainability and other key topics.
     
  Home Business CenterRead Next: How to Start a Mobile Spa  
     
Like us? Share us! Can’t Find Something? Let Us Know!
Free eBook!Learn new ways to increase your income each month. Plus get the Home Business Insider that shows how you can make money this week by freelancing. All Free!
Email address First name Topics you want to learn about We don’t spam & won’t sell your email

 

Helping Entrepreneurs Succeed Since 1997. Faster, Easier, Cheaper.

© 1997-
2012 By Home Business Center, Inc. | California USA

Start-Up Business Checklist Business Start-Up Guides Small Business Financing Marketing Ideas Advertising   Contact Us Privacy About Us Better Business Bureau Small Business Administration
 

Makeup & Cosmetic Business

Posted: July 5, 2012 in Uncategorized
Home Business Center: How to start a home business

Start a Makeup / Cosmetics Business 1-2-3


Makeup artists are in high demand in a variety of different fields: from television to salons to weddings to modeling agencies to advertisements and more.

Each state has its own licensing requirements, but generally makeup artists will need to complete training, pass an exam and work a certain number of field hours in order to receive a cosmetology license.

Start by contacting the Board of Cosmetology in your state for requirements and procedures.

Use a cosmetics business plan to outline the steps needed to become a makeup artist. Or maybe you are interested in opening a cosmetics store or starting a makeup line?…

Steps to Starting a Makeup Artist Business

1. Acquire the education and training you need to become a makeup artist. Once you complete your training and hours, you can take the cosmetology licensing exam and obtain your license. You will also need a business license, which you would apply for after you register your business with the county clerk’s office.

2. Next, establish a business bank account. This way, you can take payments from clients while keeping business and personal finances separate. Consider accepting credit cards from customers, as this can greatly increase your income.

3. Manage business finances with easy-to-use accounting software. You’ll be able to track income and outgo, but also invoice clients, manage customers and print tax reports. You may also want invoice software.

4. Purchase the makeup artist supplies that you need. There are also some great online resources for airbrush makeup and private label mineral makeup that you can sell under your own name.

Basic supplies include brushes, makeup kits, containers, disposable applicators, brush cleaners, alcohol, sponges, eyelash curlers, etc.. but also general business supplies like business cards, business forms and a business phone line.

5. Set up a company website using a professional free website builder. A website is an inexpensive marketing tool and is ideal for displaying images of your location, staff, your background, a list of services you provide, a map to your office, coupons, client testimonials, etc..

6. Having contacts in the field can greatly help your career, so volunteer and internet when you’re getting started. The connections you make can pay off later in more clients and less ad costs. If you need help writing a business plan, use the cosmetics business plan template.

Getting Started:

Become a Makeup ArtistGet insider tips from Emmy Award-Winning Makeup Pros and save yourself a lot of time and money. Avoid common mistakes and get the answers you need to get your business profitable – quickly. Find out:

  • What types of makeup and application tools you should have in your professional makeup kit, what other supplies you need to get started – and how to launch with little or no money.
  • Information on getting permits, a license, other legal requirements, where to find suppliers, how to set up a storefront or work from home.
  • As Seen in Oprah's NewsletterHow to identify potential clients, get creative marketing ideas and prepare promotional materials that land you jobs. Plus how to create a professional portfolioand do a client presentation that will impress people so you don’t have to do a hard sales pitch.
  • Makeup artist invoice template, press releases and cover letters included.

Go!Makeup Artist Start-Up Guide

Cosmetics Marketing and Advertising Techniques

1. Your Portfolio:

Start by building your portfolio. New clients will want to see your “work”, and pictures are a great tool for demonstrating this. Also get testimonials from past customers if you can. If you are just starting out without any customers, you can volunteer at local fashion shows to build up your portfolio.

2. Business Name Ideas for Makeup Artists:

Your company name is also important in marketing. A good business name tells people who you are, shows how you differentiate yourself from the marketplace and determines how the public perceives you. Use the free business name generator to help you come up with a name for your cosmetics business. An impressive logo is also important – a picture is worth 1,000 words. Design your own logo for cheap.

3. Makeup Artist Business Cards:

Have business cards and brochures printed to introduce your business (See cosmetics brochure designs). Partner with local businesses offering similar beauty services to yours – but not directly competing with you (i.e. tanning salons, hair or nail salons, spas, etc..). Ask if you can leave a few business cards or brochures with them in exchange for handing out their brochures/business cards to your clients. You may want to offer a first-time buyer discount in your brochure to attract new customers to contact you.

4. Write a short press release to your local newspaper (here’s how: press release writing tips) announcing your new business and the services you offer. Include a limited offer or details on a special event you are hosting that will make your story interesting. The more interesting the story, the more likely the newspaper (or magazine) is to print it. Remember – this is FREE advertising, so use it to your benefit. You can submit more than one press release, and you can contact your local radio and TV stations as well.

Other public relations strategies you can use to get free advertising for your cosmetics business:

5. Write articles. You don’t have to be a professional writer, but you can get free press and draw in customers by sharing helpful or interesting information in your area of expertise. Articles can be short, and you can submit them to multiple article directories online for free. See how to write articles to get customers.
6. Use social media. Twitter and Facebook can get you a lot of free publicity when used correctly. The key is to combine useful content for your readers in addition to promotional efforts.
7. Start speaking. Many women’s organizations or community groups like to have speakers at their meetings or events. Look for groups oriented toward fashion, beauty and women’s interests, and you get free publicity for your business by giving a brief and informative presentation or workshop. This also helps establish you as an expert in your field. Get free advertising with public speaking.
8. Want people to find your website in the search engines? Get listed in 20 search engines for free or in 300 search engines for $4.

Finding Cosmetics Jobs & Customers

Job Search  
job title, keywords, company, location jobs by job search

Whether you want to find customers or do freelance work as an independent contractor, online job sites can be a good way to find work and clients.

Why? Some companies looking to hire may be open to outsource to an independent contractor because they don’t have to incur hiring fees. You can also set up a partnership where you pay them a referral fee for any customers they send you. See also: Find Freelance Work Online

Cosmetics Business Associations

  • Personal Care Products CouncilThe Personal Care Products Council is the leading national trade association for the cosmetic and personal care products industry and represents the most innovative names in beauty today.
  • Independent Cosmetics Manufacturers and DistributorsICMAD is a non-profit group that offers services to innovative cosmetic companies to help them succeed in the highly cometitive cosmetic market.
  • Organic Consumers Association Consumers Association (OCA) is an online and grassroots non-profit 501(c)3 public interest organization campaigning for health, justice, and sustainability. The OCA deals with crucial issues of food safety, industrial agriculture, genetic engineering, children’s health, corporate accountability, Fair Trade, environmental sustainability and other key topics.
     
  Home Business CenterRead Next: How to Start a Mobile Spa  
     
Like us? Share us! Can’t Find Something? Let Us Know!
Free eBook!Learn new ways to increase your income each month. Plus get the Home Business Insider that shows how you can make money this week by freelancing. All Free!
Email address First name Topics you want to learn about We don’t spam & won’t sell your email

 

Helping Entrepreneurs Succeed Since 1997. Faster, Easier, Cheaper.

© 1997-
2012 By Home Business Center, Inc. | California USA

Start-Up Business Checklist Business Start-Up Guides Small Business Financing Marketing Ideas Advertising   Contact Us Privacy About Us Better Business Bureau Small Business Administration
 

Makeup & Cosmetic Business

Posted: July 5, 2012 in Uncategorized
Home Business Center: How to start a home business

Start a Makeup / Cosmetics Business 1-2-3


Makeup artists are in high demand in a variety of different fields: from television to salons to weddings to modeling agencies to advertisements and more.

Each state has its own licensing requirements, but generally makeup artists will need to complete training, pass an exam and work a certain number of field hours in order to receive a cosmetology license.

Start by contacting the Board of Cosmetology in your state for requirements and procedures.

Use a cosmetics business plan to outline the steps needed to become a makeup artist. Or maybe you are interested in opening a cosmetics store or starting a makeup line?…

Steps to Starting a Makeup Artist Business

1. Acquire the education and training you need to become a makeup artist. Once you complete your training and hours, you can take the cosmetology licensing exam and obtain your license. You will also need a business license, which you would apply for after you register your business with the county clerk’s office.

2. Next, establish a business bank account. This way, you can take payments from clients while keeping business and personal finances separate. Consider accepting credit cards from customers, as this can greatly increase your income.

3. Manage business finances with easy-to-use accounting software. You’ll be able to track income and outgo, but also invoice clients, manage customers and print tax reports. You may also want invoice software.

4. Purchase the makeup artist supplies that you need. There are also some great online resources for airbrush makeup and private label mineral makeup that you can sell under your own name.

Basic supplies include brushes, makeup kits, containers, disposable applicators, brush cleaners, alcohol, sponges, eyelash curlers, etc.. but also general business supplies like business cards, business forms and a business phone line.

5. Set up a company website using a professional free website builder. A website is an inexpensive marketing tool and is ideal for displaying images of your location, staff, your background, a list of services you provide, a map to your office, coupons, client testimonials, etc..

6. Having contacts in the field can greatly help your career, so volunteer and internet when you’re getting started. The connections you make can pay off later in more clients and less ad costs. If you need help writing a business plan, use the cosmetics business plan template.

Getting Started:

Become a Makeup ArtistGet insider tips from Emmy Award-Winning Makeup Pros and save yourself a lot of time and money. Avoid common mistakes and get the answers you need to get your business profitable – quickly. Find out:

  • What types of makeup and application tools you should have in your professional makeup kit, what other supplies you need to get started – and how to launch with little or no money.
  • Information on getting permits, a license, other legal requirements, where to find suppliers, how to set up a storefront or work from home.
  • As Seen in Oprah's NewsletterHow to identify potential clients, get creative marketing ideas and prepare promotional materials that land you jobs. Plus how to create a professional portfolioand do a client presentation that will impress people so you don’t have to do a hard sales pitch.
  • Makeup artist invoice template, press releases and cover letters included.

Go!Makeup Artist Start-Up Guide

Cosmetics Marketing and Advertising Techniques

1. Your Portfolio:

Start by building your portfolio. New clients will want to see your “work”, and pictures are a great tool for demonstrating this. Also get testimonials from past customers if you can. If you are just starting out without any customers, you can volunteer at local fashion shows to build up your portfolio.

2. Business Name Ideas for Makeup Artists:

Your company name is also important in marketing. A good business name tells people who you are, shows how you differentiate yourself from the marketplace and determines how the public perceives you. Use the free business name generator to help you come up with a name for your cosmetics business. An impressive logo is also important – a picture is worth 1,000 words. Design your own logo for cheap.

3. Makeup Artist Business Cards:

Have business cards and brochures printed to introduce your business (See cosmetics brochure designs). Partner with local businesses offering similar beauty services to yours – but not directly competing with you (i.e. tanning salons, hair or nail salons, spas, etc..). Ask if you can leave a few business cards or brochures with them in exchange for handing out their brochures/business cards to your clients. You may want to offer a first-time buyer discount in your brochure to attract new customers to contact you.

4. Write a short press release to your local newspaper (here’s how: press release writing tips) announcing your new business and the services you offer. Include a limited offer or details on a special event you are hosting that will make your story interesting. The more interesting the story, the more likely the newspaper (or magazine) is to print it. Remember – this is FREE advertising, so use it to your benefit. You can submit more than one press release, and you can contact your local radio and TV stations as well.

Other public relations strategies you can use to get free advertising for your cosmetics business:

5. Write articles. You don’t have to be a professional writer, but you can get free press and draw in customers by sharing helpful or interesting information in your area of expertise. Articles can be short, and you can submit them to multiple article directories online for free. See how to write articles to get customers.
6. Use social media. Twitter and Facebook can get you a lot of free publicity when used correctly. The key is to combine useful content for your readers in addition to promotional efforts.
7. Start speaking. Many women’s organizations or community groups like to have speakers at their meetings or events. Look for groups oriented toward fashion, beauty and women’s interests, and you get free publicity for your business by giving a brief and informative presentation or workshop. This also helps establish you as an expert in your field. Get free advertising with public speaking.
8. Want people to find your website in the search engines? Get listed in 20 search engines for free or in 300 search engines for $4.

Finding Cosmetics Jobs & Customers

Job Search  
job title, keywords, company, location jobs by job search

Whether you want to find customers or do freelance work as an independent contractor, online job sites can be a good way to find work and clients.

Why? Some companies looking to hire may be open to outsource to an independent contractor because they don’t have to incur hiring fees. You can also set up a partnership where you pay them a referral fee for any customers they send you. See also: Find Freelance Work Online

Cosmetics Business Associations

  • Personal Care Products CouncilThe Personal Care Products Council is the leading national trade association for the cosmetic and personal care products industry and represents the most innovative names in beauty today.
  • Independent Cosmetics Manufacturers and DistributorsICMAD is a non-profit group that offers services to innovative cosmetic companies to help them succeed in the highly cometitive cosmetic market.
  • Organic Consumers Association Consumers Association (OCA) is an online and grassroots non-profit 501(c)3 public interest organization campaigning for health, justice, and sustainability. The OCA deals with crucial issues of food safety, industrial agriculture, genetic engineering, children’s health, corporate accountability, Fair Trade, environmental sustainability and other key topics.
     
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Issue 60 January 2004  •  Contents  •  Home     

 


ADULT EDUCATION

How Adults Learn

J. Muller


 

he theories of lifelong education and of life-span development may have been the most important theoretical contributions to adult education in recent years. We now know that not only children can learn. In a man’s life-span there is no division between a period of learning and application of what has been learned earlier. Learning and application are interwoven, both continue and both reinforce each other. However, the way adults learn is different from the way learn. What does it mean to be an adult learner? What are the characteristics of an adult learner?

1.1.

Who is an adult? The meaning of adulthood

 

Rogers distinguishes three main clusters of ideas within any of adulthood:

  • The idea of maturity, of full development, personal growth and expansion and utilization of all the individual’s talents;

  • the idea of a sense of perspective leading to sounder judgements about oneself and about others;

  • the idea of autonomy, responsible decision making, voluntariness rather than involuntariness.

 

According to Rogers adult learners

 

  • are adults by definition; but some are more adults than others; some are still searching in education for dependency, others for autonomy;

  • are in a continuing process of growth, but they grow in different direction’s and at a different pace;

  • bring with them a package of experience and, values, but degree of willingness to use this material to help the learn process differs;

  • come to education with intentions and’ needs, some specific, some more general and related to the subject matter under discussion, and others unknown even to themselves;

  • bring expectations about the learning process; they are all at different points in the spectrum between those who require to be taught everything and those who wish to find out everything for themselves; and they each have some consciousness of what they can and cannot do in the way of learning;

  • already have their own set patterns of learning, which vary considerably one from the other.

  •  

1.2. Characteristics of adult learning

 

Education of children is compulsory, formal and standardized. Adult learning is voluntary and intentional. The aim of adult education is the independent self-directed learner. Adults tend to resist a learning process which is incongruent with their self-concept as autonomous individuals and does not correspond to their needs and interests.

 

Adult learning is learner-centered

What children learn in school should be useful to them — but later in life. Child learning is subject-centered. Adult learning is learner-centered. Adults focus on direct application. Given their daily obligations in job, profession, family and community they learn to cope with the pressures and problems of life they are facing. In consequence the adult educator’s concern is not only and not even primarily the logical development of a subject matter but the needs and interests of the learners. “Andragogy (adult education) calls for program builders and teachers who are person-centered, who don’t teach subject matter but rather help persons learn” (Knowles). However, the interests of adults are their real needs. Or the solutions learners have in mind do not solve their problems. The adult educator often has to enter into a “needs negotiation” (Bhola) with learners when teaching new needs about boiled water or a balanced diet, about clean surroundings, preventive health practices or small families. In the dialectical process of needs negotiation the needs as felt by the learners and the needs as seen by the adult educators must be brought together to reach a consensus on the “real” needs. These real needs must correspond to the experience of adult learners. If an adult gets the impression that his experience is not being valued he feels rejected as a person. New learnings take on meaning as adults are able to relate them to their life experience. Experienced adult educators, therefore, build into the design of their learning experiences provision for the learners to plan and rehearse how they are going to apply their learnings in their day-to-day lives or duties and combine training with transfer and application. A workshop then really can become a workplace where educational materials are produced or evaluation studies are designed.

 

Adult learning is social learning

According to Knox’s proficiency theory the learning needs for an adult arise from life situations and interpersonal communication. Social expectation motivates and empowers an adult to search for more knowledge, better proficiency and more suitable performance. Adult learning is based on experience, on the learners’ own experience and on the experience of others. Learning settings of adults usually have a participatory and collaborative element. Adults prefer to meet as equals in small groups to explore issues and concerns and then to take common action as a result of dialogue and inter-learning by discourse. The group becomes the “learning co-operative”. The group provides the opportunity for inter-learning. Within the group the teacher as well as the other group members play the role of facilitators. All group members become “co-agents” (Bhola) in learning.

 

The absence of formal accreditation or certification facilitates collaboration not only on a specific product or outcome but even in structuring and restructuring the learning process according to the needs and interests of the group. The learning process becomes as important as the learning outcome, and a balance between both is often difficult to maintain. How much freedom can actually be given to the adult learner in choice of content and method?

 

Adult learning is active learning

Adult learning is life-centered. It is learning by doing, by application and experience, and if need be by trail and error. Adults do not simply receive knowledge created by outsiders, but should examine their own reality themselves and make assertions about it. “Praxis” is the focus of effective adult learning and praxis means analysis and examination of reality in order to transform it. Adult learning is a continuous process of investigation and exploration followed by action grounded in this exploration, followed by reflection on this action, leading to further investigation and so on. The principle is testing not “banking” (P. Freire) of knowledge. Exploration of new ideas, skills and knowledge take place in the context of the learners’ experience. In settings where skills are being learned, learners become acquainted with skills, apply these in real life settings, redefine hoe these skills may be altered by context, re-apply these in other settings and so on. Adults interpret ideas, skills and knowledge through the medium of their life-experience and test them in real life settings. To make the learner self-directed is the purpose of adult education. But the self-directed learner is neither the one who can retrieve information or locate resources nor the one who emerges in group dynamics. The “inner-directed, self-operating learner” (R. Kidd) is the one who reflects critically on his own assumptions and is keen to find alternative and better solutions.

 

Adult learning means acquiring knowledge and competence

The learning process contributes largely to the success of learning. But learning is more than just the learning process. A participative learning process which fails to assist the learners in acquiring knowledge and competence is a failure. A participative learning process may take more time because it means active involvement of everybody, discussing all the pro’s and con’s, nevertheless it must lead to concrete results combining commitment with competence. Education is, as Brookfield points out a ” transactional encounters”. That means that the sole responsibility for determining curricula or for selecting appropriate methods does not rest either with the educator or with the learner. If the first obtains, then we have an authoritarian style and a one-way transmission of knowledge and skills. If curricula, methods and evaluative criteria become predetermined solely by what learners say they want, then the “cafeteria approach” governs the educational process. Accepting the felt needs rationale without any further inquiry and needs negotiation means that the facilitator has abandoned responsibility for the learning process and the achievement of learning aims and objectives. Successful learning especially in workshop settings means to keep the balance between the learning process and the learning outcome so that the results justify the efforts and if they are not excellent they should be at least and always ” good enough”.

 

2. Principles of participatory training

The training model presented in this handbook is based on participation. The principles of participatory training (Shrivastave and Tandon explain these principle in greater detail) reflect how adults learn.

 

Participatory training is life-centered

What is learned must be applicable to real life situations. A workshop programme, therefore, must provide opportunity and assist adult learners to apply what has been learned to life situations and job requirements.

 

Participatory training is learner-centred

A workshop programme arises out of the needs of participants as articulated by them and negotiated with them. These “needs-negotiations” are necessary to keep the balance between the interests and needs as voiced by the learners and the state-of-the-art of the subject matter which learners have to become familiar with in order to acquire knowledge and competence and to get the feeling of success and achievement. However, participants should always maintain control of the training process and influence upon the methods used.

 

Participatory training is flexible

The teaching-learning process, whi1e not losing track of the objectives and the subject matter, should always take into consideration the problems participants are facing and the learning progress, they are making. The programme schedule must be open and leave room for repetition and the unforeseen. Tue final programme of a workshop evolves as the workshop goes on.

 

Participatory training is comprehensive with focus on awareness, as well as on knowledge and skills

This combined focus makes the choice of training methods complex. Awareness-raising, is most aptly achieved through a dialogue between facilitator and learner. Knowledge-acquisition is most effectively done through lecture-discussions or-readings based on’ handbooks and ‘carefully selected reference material. Learning new skills or sharpening existing ones demands giving opportunity to practice within a workshop, be it in groups (with peer review) or individually under guidance by the facilitator.

 

Participatory training is learning through the experiences of learners

Learners come with their experiences and make new ones during the training process. It is important that learners (and resource persons) report on their experiences and share their experiences to find appropriate solutions. Thus a workshop becomes a “learning cooperatives.”

 

Participatory training is based on mutual respect

Learners always need a opportunity to first unlearn and then relearn. Both processes imply a deficiency and can be highly threatening to a person. In order to accept criticism’ learners must feel accepted as they are, must be encouraged to run risks and to accept support. The atmosphere in a workshop must be such that participants enjoy learning and feel comfortable and confident that, whatever happens in training, will not be used against them.

 

In participatory training trainers are a team of facilitators

In participatory training the trainers’ behaviour and value system is as important as his professional knowledge and his teaching abilities. In workshop settings trainers should work as a team of facilitators, open to self-criticism, ready to support each other without becoming defensive against participants. The team of facilitators should be present throughout a workshop from its beginning to the end.

 

The venue is of great influence on the learning process

The venue shou1d facilitate an uninterrupted learning process. It should be outside major towns, where participants, free from daily obligations, can exchange their experiences and cooperate in finding solutions. It will usually be a residential setting so that the learning co-operative becomes a captive audience.

 

Participatory training is based on feedback

Nobody is perfect! Feedback is necessary not only to adapt an ongoing workshop programme to the learning needs and progress of participants but also to learn from past workshop experiences in order to prove future programmes. This can be done by appropriate methods of internal evaluation be it formative during the workshop or summative at its end

 

3. The Action Training Model (ATM).

A model to combine principles of adult education and participatory training with production

The Action Training Model is meant to train adult educators. It takes into consideration how adults learn and is based on the principles of participatory training.

 

3.1. The emergence of the model

The Action Training Model (ATM) grew out of the need to assist adult educators and development workers to cope with specific tasks for which they had no specific training, e.g. to do systematic evaluations, to produce reading materials for new readers coining out of literacy programmes or to produce distance education materials for untrained teachers or literacy workers. In contrast to the well known “all-talk seminars and no-work-workshops” the Action Training Model combines training with action and production. In a workshop setting participants get the necessary know-how to elaborate a concrete product, be it an evaluation report or a distance education unit — and they do it. They do the “real thing” not just an assignment for the wake of training. The skills learned are acquired within the framework of production. As this is not feasible within a two weeks training setting of a workshop, the model combines collective training in a sequence of workshops with individual work under guidance at the place of work, or in the field.

This combination of inter-learning and cooperating in workshop, settings on the one hand with individual work under guidance at the place or work on the other is the essence of the Action Training Model. It should be noted, that the Action Training Model does not imply to specifically “go to the field” as it is the case in operational seminars. The “field” is the learner’s usual place of work and nothing else. Te go to this field is not an extra (and artificial) activity. It is the learner’s job.

 

The model makes some important assumptions about delivery and design of training (Bhola).

 

3.2. Assumptions about the delivery of training

The ATM is a model of in-service and block-release training for , middle level technical personnel based on workshops of about two weeks duration combined with individual work under guidance on a concrete task be it an evaluation unit to be conducted or a distance education unit or a booklet for new’ readers to be written’. The assumption here is that adults who are at work cannot spare much time for time for long-term training courses and that training for this group must be practical and tailor-made to assist them in fulfilling their daily duties. In a first workshop of about two to three weeks duration participants get a systematic introduction to the subject matter e.g. evaluation or the writing of distance education materials and they elaborate an evaluation proposal or draft a distance education unit.

After the first workshop they go back to their places of work and collect data in the field or develop instruments to test their units or booklets. They do this under guidance of experienced resource persons. A few months later they come for a second workshop, a “mid-term panel”, and present their data collections or tested distance education units. They get information on data organization and analysis and they organize and analyse their data or they get feedback from peers and resource persons on their test instruments and how to use them. After the mid-term panel participants write their evaluation reports or test their units. In a third workshop they present their evaluation reports for discussion or their distance education units for further review refinement and editing. Thus, participants can follow a training course of up to one years duration without being absent from their places of work for more than five to six weeks. The time in-between the-workshops is filled with work on a concrete project. However, to finalise the project means longterm commitment both by the participants themselves, by the group of resource persons who have to assist participants, and by the institutions participants come from who have to give all necessary support.

 

3.3. Assumptions in design of training

The training design is based on the principles of adult learning and participatory training.

 

The model combines training and action

All training takes place in the work context of participants. Each participant is working on a concrete task, an evaluation proposal, a unit of a distance education course or a booklet for new readers.

He/she gets familiar with subject matter immediate application of what has been taught in lecture-discussions. All learning is active learning, is learning by doing.

 

The model is learner-centred

Participants are being confronted with problems they face in their daily work situations and they get guidance on how to solve some of these problems. Their experience becomes a learning tool, their needs the focus of learning process. With whatever background and whatever intentions participants come — participants in workshops are not just there to be taught; they are the greatest resource in the learning co-operative.

 

Multiple’ contexts and settings for learning, including discussions, individually guided instruction, and group work with peer review allow appropriate connections between learning task requirements, learning needs and styles of participants.

 

The model is based on systematic learning

Participants become familiar with the subject matter by through it systematically and a concrete task step by step. To facilitate this process special handbooks are developed by the facilitators. These handbooks guide the participant through all the necessary steps and give a complete overview on the subject matter including some theoretical background so that the actual workshop programme can make some selective choices in presentation of the subject matter by focusing on certain aspects and specific needs of participants.

 

The model is flexible and based on active involvement of all participants

All participants are actively involved in planning, executing and evaluating their own learning process. The first workshop begins with an analysis of needs and interests of participants followed by a process of “needs negotiation” to harmonize interests and needs as voiced by participants with the state-of-the-art of the subject matter and the requirements of a structured and systemic learning process. While the topics to be dealt with are defined to some extent by the state-of-the-art of the subject matter, the programme schedule is kept open and flexible. The schedule is being developed in a daily process of adaptation of what has to be learned to progress of the learning process and difficulties participants face. The curriculum of each workshop is being “re-invented” in the actual teaching-learning process. This re-invention does not only validate curriculum choices but also aids participants to claim ownership of the programme. To re-invent the workshop programme is the task of the steering committee in which all faculty members and a number of delegates from the learners cooperate to review the programme of the day and to plan for the following day.

 

The model is based on social learning

 

The learning process does not only have a participatory element, it has a collaborative element as well. Participants work together in groups, they get assistance and feedback from the group. Resource persons who take part in the entire workshop (and don’t turn up for specific sessions only) work as a team, they consult with each other, they practice team-teaching and they are “at the disposal of participants” whenever needed to assist them in completing their tasks. The social architecture of the workshop develops a cohesive community of learners, a “learning co-operative” who can stand the “pressure-cooker effect” of (sometimes) a fifty to sixty hours week of work on a specific task.

 

The model alms at successful learning

Participants get all possible assistance individually and as a group within and outside workshop settings to complete ~their tasks. A system of continuous feedback from participants has been developed through the steering committee, through reporting back sessions on groupwork in plenary, through individual guidance by resource persons, through critical review of the products of participants by peers and by resource persons. This feedback system combined with summative evaluation of each workshop is an, essential element of continuous programme review and improvement.

 

It is not only a reliable test instrument of what each participant has learned and achieved. It contributes considerably to the success of the learning process.

 

The Action Training Model is applicable in a variety of settings in formal training within universities and specialized training institutions and in non formal settings for staff development in education, health, business, government and the like. It is a challenge to the “all-talk seminars” and “no-work workshops”. For the learners as well as for the team of resource persons who have accepted this challenge, it can be an experience of high satisfaction.

 

Sources

H. S Bhola, Training Evaluators in the Third World: Implementation of the Action Training Model (ATM) In Kenya. Evaluation and Program Planning, Vol.12, pp. 249-258, Pergamon Press, Oxford, New York 1989

James Roby Kidd, How Adults Learn, Association Press, New York 1975 rev.

Malcolm S. Knowles, The Modern Praxis of Adult Education. Andragogy versus Pedagogy. Association Press, New York 1976

A. B. Knox, Adult Development and Learning. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, London 1977

Alan Rogers, Teaching Adults. Open University Press, Milton Keynes, Philadelphia 1986

Om Shrivastava and Rajesh Tandon (eds.), Participatory Training for Rural Development. Society for Participatory Research in Asia. 45, Sainik Farm, Khanpur, New Delhi 1982.

 

 

This feature: Muller, J. (1993) The action training model and its educational foundations. Adult education and development p. 239-253

 

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